Physiological demands of the marathon

Applied physiology of marathon running. Performance in marathon running is influenced by a variety of factors, most of which are of a physiological nature. Accordingly, the marathon runner must rely to a large extent on a high aerobic capacity.

Physiological demands of the marathon

Running a marathon has been viewed, and still is by many, as too extreme to be healthy. While marathon running is far from damaging, it should be respected for the physiological stress inflicted over its For example, running a five-minute-per-mile marathon requires a fold increase in energy production for over two hours.

Even runners who finish in over four hours maintain a fold increase in their metabolism. Such extended energy demands require the cardiorespiratory, endocrine, and neuromuscular systems to operate at an elevated level for an inordinate length of time.

It is no wonder then that the story of Pheidippides and his marathon run to Athens easily grew into a tragic tale about how running a marathon killed the first person to do so. Fortunately, scientists have researched the physiological stresses of running a marathon.

The decrease in running economy during a triathlon and/or a marathon could be largely linked to physiological factors such as the enhancement of core temperature and a lack of fluid balance. The decrease in running economy during a triathlon and/or a marathon could be largely linked to physiological factors such as the enhancement of core temperature and a . This and other questions regarding marathon running were addressed at The Marathon: Physiological, Medical, Epidemiological, and Psychological Studies conference in which will increase the energy demands of running a marathon. Also, for every gram of glycogen stored, almost 3 grams of water are stored with it. This can leave a runner.

The findings from such studies can help potential marathon runners better appreciate what they will be up against and remind seasoned marathon runners just how amazing the human body is.

Upon his arrival, Pheidippides exclaimed, "Rejoice, we conquer" and dropped dead-or did he? The accuracy of this account has been questioned by modern scholars Martin and Gynn ; however, the unfortunate outcome of Pheidippides is manifested in a few marathon runners every year.

Just how stressful to the human body is running a marathon? This and other questions regarding marathon running were addressed at The Marathon: Physiological, Medical, Epidemiological, and Psychological Studies conference in The boldest theory regarding marathon running was made by Dr.

Tom Basslerwho suggested that the stress of running a marathon built immunity to the development of fatty deposits within coronary arteries. In other words, running a marathon prevents coronary artery disease CAD.

Bassler compared marathon runners to the heart-disease-free Masai warriors and Tarahumara Indians in that they all maintain active lifestyles, eat healthy diets, and have enlarged and wide-bore coronary arteries. After reviewing the cause of death in marathon runners from the previous 10 years, Bassler claimed that "there have been no reports of fatal, histologically proven, [CAD] deaths among 42K men.

To his credit, Bassler also acknowledged that a low-fat diet and abstention from smoking play important roles in developing immunity to heart disease. Bassler concluded that whether running a marathon offered absolute protection from CAD would be proven within the following 10 years.

Just What Does Running a Marathon Do to Your Body?

Noakes bolstered his opposition with a follow-up report on a total of 36 documented cases of heart attacks or sudden death in marathon runners prior to Angiography, autopsy, or electrocardiographic results were available for 27 of the runners, 25 of whom had some degree of CAD.

Sudden death occurred in 22 of the 36 runners, with 19 of those deaths occurring during, immediately after, or within 24 hours after running a marathon or a long training run.

While this report clearly showed that marathon running alone does not guarantee a life free of CAD, it should be noted that the contributing factors of smoking and diet mentioned by Bassler were not addressed. Jim Fixx was an overweight, overstressed smoker whose father suffered a heart attack at the age of 35 and died eight years later.

Rehabilitation of a tennis injury motivated Fixx to start running to the point that he completed several marathons and wrote the bestseller The Complete Book of Running. Unfortunately, his passion for running came to an end along a Vermont road in when, in the middle of a run, Jim Fixx died of a heart attack.

An autopsy found a complete blockage in one coronary artery, an 80 percent blockage in another, and signs of previous heart attacks. While true, the risk for sudden death is greater in marathon runners who, similar to Fixx, have a positive family history, elevated cholesterol, and warning signs such as angina, nausea, and epigastric discomfort Noakes This was confirmed by Maron et al.

Out ofrunners, there were four deaths, three men and one woman. One of the men experienced chest pains at mile 20 and died 15 minutes after finishing, while the other three runners died on the course.

Two of the men had significant blockage greater than 50 percent in three arteries, and the other had significant blockage in two arteries.The decrease in running economy during a triathlon and/or a marathon could be largely linked to physiological factors such as the enhancement of core temperature and a lack of fluid balance.

Moreover, the increase in circulating free fatty acids and glycerol at the end of these long exercise durations bear witness to the decrease in Cr values. The decrease in running economy during a triathlon and/or a marathon could be largely linked to physiological factors such as the enhancement of core temperature and a .

The marathon demands respect. The physiological and psychological demands are extreme; therefore, you must plan your preparation intelligently and thoroughly. The decrease in running economy during a triathlon and/or a marathon could be largely linked to physiological factors such as the enhancement of core temperature and a lack of fluid balance.

The aim of the marathon is to maintain a high power output over the official km distance, a feat which requires substantial physical and psychological preparedness (John A. Hawley & Fiona J.

Physiological demands of the marathon

Spargo, ; McLaughlin, Howley, . Summary. Performance in marathon running is influenced by a variety of factors, most of which are of a physiological nature. Accordingly, the marathon runner must rely .

Marathon Runner Requirements | Healthy Living