The significance of symbolism in george eliots novel silas marner

Plot summary[ edit ] The novel is set in the early years of the 19th century. Silas Marner, a weaver, is a member of a small Calvinist congregation in Lantern Yard, a slum street in Northern England. He is falsely accused of stealing the congregation's funds while watching over the very ill deacon. Two clues are given against Silas:

The significance of symbolism in george eliots novel silas marner

The significance of symbolism in george eliots novel silas marner

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. The Individual Versus the Community Silas Marner is in one sense the story of the title character, but it is also very much about the community of Raveloe in which he lives.

Silas, who goes from being a member of a tight-knit community to utterly alone and then back again, is a perfect vehicle for Eliot to explore the relationship between the individual and the surrounding community.

The community also provides its members with a structured sense of identity. As an outsider, living apart from this social structure, Silas initially lacks any sense of this identity. Not able to understand Silas in the context of their community, the villagers see him as strange, regarding him with a mixture of fear and curiosity.

Silas is compared to an apparition both when he shows up at the Rainbow and the Red House.

The significance of symbolism in george eliots novel silas marner

To be outside the community is to be something unnatural, even otherworldly. Eliot suggests that the interconnectedness of community is not something one necessarily enters into voluntarily, nor something one can even avoid.

In terms of social standing, Silas and Godfrey are quite far from each other: By braiding together the fates of these two characters and showing how the rest of the village becomes implicated as well, Eliot portrays the bonds of community at their most inescapable and pervasive.

Character as Destiny The plot of Silas Marner seems mechanistic at times, as Eliot takes care to give each character his or her just deserts. For Eliot, who we are determines not only what we do, but also what is done to us. Nearly any character in the novel could serve as an example of this moral order, but perhaps the best illustration is Godfrey.

Godfrey usually means well, but is unwilling to make sacrifices for what he knows to be right.

George Eliot A child, more than all other giftsThat earth can offer to declining man,Brings hope with it, and forward-looking thoughts. The titular Silas Marner is a man who has lost hope in God and humanity
Silas Marner Symbols from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes Symbols are objects, characters, figures, or colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts.
From the SparkNotes Blog Plot summary[ edit ] The novel is set in the early years of the 19th century. Silas Marner, a weaver, is a member of a small Calvinist congregation in Lantern Yard, a slum street in Northern England.
SparkNotes: Silas Marner: Themes It should be remembered, however, that what a good novel says is not detachable from the way it says it. The meaning is a part of the style and structure, and themes cannot be set out in so many pointed quotations.
Silas Marner Lantern Yard As a symbol of Marner's stringent and unforgiving past, Lantern Yard--ironically named as it symbolizes darkness--creates a pall over the life of the lonely weaver.

At one point Godfrey finds himself actually hoping that Molly will die, as his constant hemming and hawing have backed him into so tight a corner that his thoughts have become truly horrible and cruel. However, throughout the novel Eliot maintains that Godfrey is not a bad person—he has simply been compromised by his inaction.

Fittingly, Godfrey ends up with a similarly compromised destiny:Silas Marner by George Eliot focuses on two of the Squire’s sons, Godfrey and Dunstan Cass.

Dunstan pressures Godfrey to do things like giving him money that’s been collected for their father. Godfrey is weak and has a secret that he doesn’t want others to know about. Get an answer for 'What is the significance of the epigraph of the novel Silas Marner by George Eliot?' and find homework help for other Silas Marner questions at eNotes.

From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Silas Marner Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays. Silas Marner is a novel by George Eliot that was first published in Summary.

Plot Overview; Summary & Analysis; Part I, Chapters 1–2; Part I, Chapters . Themes are simply ideas that Eliot develops in the course of the novel.

Related Questions

It should be remembered, however, that what a good novel says is not detachable from the way it says rutadeltambor.com meaning is a part of the style and structure, and themes cannot be set out in so many pointed quotations. Silas Marner, the Weaver of Raveloe By titling her novel Silas Marner, Eliot is participating in a long tradition of naming books after their protagonist: Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Samuel Richardson's Pamela, Jane Austen's Emma, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, and so on.

A summary of Themes in George Eliot's Silas Marner. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Silas Marner and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Silas Marner - Wikipedia